Miles Davis, I've been swayed by the cool


teland:

kyraneko:

fannybawws:

Of course the dudebro division of DC wants to get rid of Dick Grayson. They haven’t done it, but only because they must grudgingly admit it would cause too much public outcry. Still, they’ve been trying it for years.

In 2010, Dan Didio and Brian Azzarello had this to say:

There was lots of applause for the Batman books, as DiDio continued to tease fans about his Dick Grayson deathwish. He revealed that “up until the eleventh hour, [Grayson] was gonna die in Infinite Crisis, and a lot after that had to be revised. But there turned out to be an outpour of trying to protect him, since he grew up with his fans. This is why we turned him into Batman.” Azzarello mockingly replied that “he’s not my Batman,” while Van Sciver observed that “every fangirl [he’s] ever met is in love with Dick Grayson. Women love that character.”

And that’s the crux of their problem with him, isn’t it? Women love him.

He was a queer icon from the start, a part of their history that DC hates to remember. Later, girls found they could explore their desires safely by crushing on him as Robin, a non-threatening, sweet, and fun character. God forbid anyone post-Miller be joyful.

He grew up into Nightwing, a character women lusted over, not because he was bursting with muscles and machismo (that’s mostly a male power fantasy) but because he was beautiful and displayed evocative emotions.

Dick has always been ambiguous in how he presents his gender, straddling the line between the traditionally feminine and traditionally masculine. Favoring bright and flamboyant clothing, being placed in the ‘damsel’ role consistently, dating women more powerful than him, stretching into gymnastic poses, even crossdressing full-stop.

Certain kinds of men (read: insecure assholes) don’t like that. They don’t like it when men are vulnerable, feminine, open. When they’re sexualized like female characters are. They don’t like it when those men are admired heroes. And they like it even less when women and queer people find them attractive. It’s threatening to them, as assertive sexuality from women and queer men always has been.

It’s okay to dislike Dick Grayson because you just don’t find him compelling, but the root of the most vitriolic hatred of Robin, especially Dick’s Robin, is usually homophobia and/or misogyny.

It doesn’t surprise me that Dan DiDio saw that women adored Dick Grayson and wanted to rip him right out of their hands like a toddler. He exudes anger and resentment for the people who call him on his bullshit. I think he enjoyed milking the possibility of killing Nightwing.

If Dick hadn’t been around since comics came into the zeitgeist, he’d probably be on the chopping block.

Certain kinds of men (read: insecure assholes) don’t like that. They don’t like it when men are vulnerable, feminine, open. When they’re sexualized like female characters are. They don’t like it when those men are admired heroes. And they like it even less when women and queer people find them attractive. It’s threatening to them, as assertive sexuality from women and queer men always has been.

They are cowards. They understand, on some level, that this is what a whole lot of women tend to like, love, lust after. They understand, on some level, that if they were like this instead, women would like them better. But they’re cowards and they’re assholes and they’re welded to their own privilege, and the concept of taking on these aspects of humanity that they’ve labeled feminine and therefore unacceptable, is unspeakable to them. Make oneself beautiful? Be approachable? Be emotionally accessible? Draw desire instead of just feeling it? Draw desire with no real control over who they’re drawing it from? Be sexy as well as sexual? Interact with women like they’re fellow human beings and worth knowing as people rather than potential suppliers of sex? Interact with women as an equal instead of a superior? Date women who are smarter, or stronger, or wiser, or wealthier, or more skilled at something? UNTHINKABLE.

They won’t do it. Maybe they can’t do it, if their privilege is so fundamental to their identity that letting go of it feels like doing without a stomach or a liver. But they don’t stop there. They resent the hell out of men who DO do all those things. They resent the hell out of men who are beautiful and emotion-having and desire-invoking and kind and sweet and loving. They resent them for being loved by women, for treating women like our desires matter, for being available as an alternate option to the chiseled, bulging, emotionless, superior-at-everything-that-matters hero that they want to be. They want to define what women should want, to receive our desire as a matter of course, either in themselves or via their block-of-masculine-stone heroes, and every time we want something else, every time we prefer the Dick Graysons of the world, or reblog the guys who pose in garter belts with bare asses, or flock around the guys who let slip enough vulnerability to be human, that’s us deciding what we desire against their preference for what we should desire, and they hate that.

They can’t, won’t, don’t wanna do any work or drop any perceived superiority or accept any vulnerability to be desired by us, and they hate anyone who does. Because it’s one more death blow to the phenomenon of women being prizes for the manliest men, as defined by men.

And now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to look up Dick Grayson. He sounds like my kind of guy.

THIS THIS THIS.

And people wonder why some of us are so fucking *pissed* about what’s been happening with Dick lately?

It was bad enough — *obscene* enough — that TPTB have been quietly erasing his Rom background for something all-White and all right, but the removal of all of the above is insult to fucking injury.

If they can’t fridge him, well, why not man him up. Square his jaw. Pink his cheeks. Squint his eyes. Put a nice big, black phallic symbol in his hands, bulk up his musculature, make him taller, and — voila!

No more problem.

Fuck you, DC.

Fellow fans? This is where loud, vocal, and *monetary* rejection comes in.

Even more than it already has.

(via b1a4gasms)

harrypotterconfessions:

lillianloverly:

THIS IS A PSA

THIS APP IS CALLED SAFETREK AND IS ABSOLUTELY INVALUABLE TO ANYONE WALKING ANYWHERE WHERE THEY DONT FEEL SAFE

YOU ENTER YOUR INFO AND SET A PIN AND THEN WHENEVER YOU DONT FEEL SAFE, YOU HOLD DOWN THE BLUE BUTTON UNTIL YOU DO

ONCE YOU RELEASE THE BUTTON, YOU HAVE 10 SECONDS TO ENTER YOUR PIN, AND IF YOU DONT THE POLICE WILL BE NOTIFIED OF YOUR LOCATION AND DISTRESS CALL

I TRULY BELIEVE THIS APP CAN HELP SOMEONE OUT THERE SO PLEASE DOWNLOAD IT

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/safetrek/id716262008?mt=8

its available on android too, so stay safe lovelies~

sorry for the offtopicness, but safety is important

(via kimshinegyu)

growth, decay, transformation 

(Source: thebluthcompany, via jakeparalta)

cutekirby:

artricahearts:

those nooks are crooks

THEYRE SO CUTE THO

cutekirby:

artricahearts:

those nooks are crooks

THEYRE SO CUTE THO

(via hexterian)


prokopetz:

prokopetz:

Rape is the only crime on the books for which arguing that the temptation to commit it was too clear and obvious to resist is treated as a defence. For every other crime, we call that a confession.

I’ve gotten more angry asks about this post than I have actual reblogs.

(via official-mens-frights-activist)

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 
 

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

 

(via official-mens-frights-activist)


igetje:

femforthought:

queerlilly:

"without us you wouldn’t have any rights!" without you we wouldn’t have to fight for them

Always this. Always.

"Remember that men gave women the right to vote!"

And remember that men should never have been at such a social and political advantage as to be able to literally give and take away rights from groups of people.

OMG THIS

(Source: bisexualkatjaa, via official-mens-frights-activist)


vanconcastiel:

ignotum-per-aeque-ignotum:

fandomstuck:

the fact that there are animals who can see colors that i cant which means that there are colors that exist that it is literally impossible for me to envision is such fucking bullshit that i wanna rip open a couch and eat it

Humans have 3 types of rods for processing color (red green and blue). Mantis Shrimp have 16.

Fucking shrimp. I will NOT be jealous of food.

(via slaine-the-terran)

Did you know?

stfusexists:

everyjoyitbrings:

collectivecrack:

White American males constitute only 33% of the population. Yet, they occupy approximately:

  • 80% of tenured positions in higher education
  • 80% of the House of Representatives
  • 80-85% of the U.S. Senate
  • 92%of Forbes 400 executive CEO-level positions
  • 90% of athletic team owners
  • 97.7% of U.S. presidents

Good thing we solved sexism and racism u guise

(Source: , via queenofattolia)

theme